Basketball Coaching: Out Now

Basketball is one of the most spectacular, dynamic and popular team sports on the planet, requiring a high level of fitness and skill. And success in basketball comes from a player’s ability to consistently execute the fundamental skills of the game and also from the coach’s ability to coach and incorporate these skills into their training programmes.

Baske9781472901880tball Coaching by Alexandru Radu is therefore a vital resource for current and aspiring coaches, covering the essential skills needed to successfully coach and develop players.

The book starts from the basics, providing guidance on skills and techniques training, tactical training and physical and psychological preparation for each individual position. It also covers elite level coaching skills, such as performance analysis and talent identification, which can be used at all levels of the game.

Illustrated throughout with diagrams to explain all drills and amazing photographs of basketball in action, it’s  the ideal tool for coaches wanting to develop a better understanding of this dynamic sport and how to coach it effectively.

To get your hands on a copy, click here.

The Other Giant Leap for Mankind

How Jonathan Edwards set a world record that’s still standing 20 years later

Ben Oakley
The Open University

In the late evening Scandinavian sun at the 1995 World Athletics Championship, Jonathan Edwards, a British triple jumper, was the tenth to jump out of of 12 finalists. He took a minute to collect himself, then sped down the runway to jump 18.16m, breaking his own world record by 18 centimetres.

Edwards wandered around in a contented daze, waiting for the distance to be displayed when he heard the crowd roar as they saw the scoreboard before he did. The jump was valid. Then, 25 minutes later Edwards went again; he looked incredibly relaxed before he sprinted for his second celebratory jump, whose rhythm and smoothness produced a further distance of 18.29m. The stadium exploded in a tumult of shared joy of witnessing something very special.

And very special it was – that record has stood for 20 years now. In a world where athletes constantly shave millimetres, seconds and nano-seconds off previous bests, that jump in 1995 is assuming the status of a mythical feat. The closest anyone else has got is 20cm away – Kenny Harrison (USA) at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. More recently, Cuban Pedro Pablo Pichardo’s steady annual improvements have seen him come within 21cm.

How did Edwards do it? He described it as a magic combination of timing and speed, power and touch. And studying his 2001 authorised biography, A Time to Jump, and his subsequent public comments can give us more insight.

Early years

A key ingredient in Edwards’s success was a genetic blueprint that meant he had raw speed on the track (according to his biography, his best 100m time is 10.48 sec). Speed as you approach take-off in triple and long jump is one of the key pre-requisites of success, since it translates into horizontal distance when jumping. But genetic potential is the relatively easy part; the rest is a blend of multiple factors.

Growing up in Ilfracoumbe, a modest town in Devon, South West England, helped. Where you grow up influences the likelihood of sporting success with small towns enabling a more supportive developmental climate. It’s often better to be a big fish in a small pond. West Buckland private school also allowed Edwards to thrive in a diverse range of sports including rugby, basketball, tennis, athletics, cricket and gym.

Participating in a rich mix of different sports in childhood is the optimal preparation for future success in most sports. Learning to move in varied ways is the best foundation, rather than specialising in one sport from an early age which might be called “extreme nurture”. Edwards eventually concentrated on jumping at the age of 21.

At school, his diminutive stature earned the nickname of “Titch” and a birthdate in May magnified his late physical development in comparison with others in his school year. A concerned PE teacher was frightened to select him for inter-school rugby fearing for his safety. Children born in May, June, July and August, the youngest in their school year, are less likely to get selected for squads in adolescence, but are more likely to achieve senior professional status: a reversal of the relative age effect. The additional challenge experienced by these initially disadvantaged younger athletes is thought to build resilience – a key component for success.

18 metre man.
John Giles/PA

Faith and training

To succeed, champions need to learn their craft. After graduating in Physics from Durham University, the 1988 Olympics was his first major event at the start of his elite development. Fortunately his body responded well to training and he mostly stayed injury-free, both of which are starting to be recognised as having genetic components.

An international athlete’s craft involves refining diet, responding to coaching analysis, conditioning in the gym and making wise travel arrangements. While in the arena, optimising the warm-up, saving energy for competition and coping with pressure all need to be incrementally developed through experience.

After six years of full-time training, aged 27, following disappointment at both the 1988 and 1992 Olympic Games, Edwards made the World Championships podium (bronze) having leapt 17.44 metres. Jumping a whole metre further seemed impossible at that time.

Athletes need to be fascinated with this process of improving. The paradox is that they need to be able to make sense of this seemingly selfish pursuit; a need to be content with the purpose of their lives. At times Edwards battled with realising his talent and fulfilling his strong Christian obligations which until 1993 meant he would not compete on Sundays. His evangelical faith helped make sense of optimising his jumping talent: it was in service to God. Many years later, in retirement and after losing his faith, he said that looking back “faith gave me more perspective on success or failure, it was my sport psychology in a way”.

A further ingredient of success is rest and recovery. Edwards was forced to recuperate after contracting Epsterin Barr virus in 1994; it meant he was revived as he eased his way back into training. It also gave him time to think deeply about his jumping technique including a new two-arm swing skywards.

The big jump

The final ingredient in the mix is supreme confidence. Edwards’s 1995 season started well. A national record in his first contest, he was on his way. Then in June he achieved the longest leap of all time, 18.43m in Lille. Unfortunately the jump was only a hair’s breath, 0.4m/sec, over the legal wind threshold. But he had re-defined the parameters of the sport.

He first broke the world record properly weeks later in Salamanca with 17.98m. Then came Gothenberg and his place in history. Watching the footage of his second, record-breaking jump, you can see that on the runway he is relishing the moment having just broken the world record again minutes previously. He knows he might do it again and is supremely confident and relaxed.

Later, he admitted that if he could combine the physicality of Gothenberg with the technical perfection of Lille he believed 18.60m was possible. He never achieved such a distance, but five years later he won gold in the 2000 Olympics, aged 34.

Jonathan Edwards’ path from a cherubic vicarage schoolboy to the 20th anniversary of his enduring triple jump world record reveals rich insights about the complex jigsaw of podium success.

Often discussions of elite athletics all too easily fall into a facile nature-nurture debate. Probing athlete’s biographies alongside research can reveal fascinating and varied routes to the top. And there are few higher (or further) athletic achievements than that great leap in 1995.

Ben Oakley is Head of Childhood, Youth and Sport at The Open University.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Strength and Conditioning for Football

The new season kicked off last Saturday, but it’s strength and conditioning (S&C) in pre-season preparation and training that will keep the majority of players injury-free as they return to play. But the work doesn’t stop there. S&C is now an integral part of any professional footballer’s training schedule throughout the season. It helps make them more robust, more efficient and more explosive.

Strength and Conditioning for Football by Mark Jarvis is the ground-breaking text on S&C and its application in the professional game. Mark is Director of Performance Solutions at the English Institute of Sport and is an Elite S&C Coach, and has used his experiences of working with first team squads in the English and Scottish Premier Leagues to write the book.

This comprehensive manual covers all aspects that contribute to successful practice so that training and playing time lost to injury is reduced. Click here to browse inside.

‘An excellent book … from someone who obviously gets it in reference to real life S&C at an elite level in soccer’ – Simon Bitcon, Head of S&C at Manchester City FC

The bible for football S&C.

This book is a unique resource for existing and aspiring football S&C coaches as well as sports science graduates and any footballer serious about their sport. This pioneering text will help shape and define the role of the S&C coach within football to help players at all levels of the game. And to get your hands on it, all you have to do is click here.

The Pain Free Cyclist

Maybe you’ve been watching the Tour and feeling inspired to get out on your bike again after a crash? Or maybe you were in the Tour and had to abandon due to injury? (Fabian, Tony, Simon, et al. – we wish you speedy recoveries.)

Well, The Pain Free Cyclist: Conquer Injury and Find Cycling Nirvana is the book for you.

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If you’re going to buy one cycling book this summer…

Written by the awesome duo of Team Chiropractor and Nutritional Strategist for Team Cannondale-Garmin, Matt Rabin and Robert Hicks, Health and Fitness Deputy Editor of Cycling Weekly, this is the ultimate guide for all cyclists on all things cycling health-related. The book takes you through the most common cycling injuries, let you know what exactly they are, why you get them and what you can do to get rid of them and get you back on the bike pain free.

And if you don’t believe me, why not listen to the cycling legend that is Sir Bradley Wiggins:

If you do need to seek help, for me it’s about trusting that the person you are seeing can help you, going with this approach has always worked for me. I believe in this book, and you’ll find out the best ways to deal with injury and the bad pain you can have on your bike. By reading this book you will be able to short cut some of the information it has taken me years and a career as a pro-cyclist to find out. Feeling strong on the bike and riding pain-free regardless of your level, from amateur to pro, is what we’re all looking for. This book will help you to beat your injuries and prevent them returning, allowing you to slot back into riding your bike as the pain-free cyclist.
See you out on the road,
Brad

Save a 1/3 off Cycling Books

Save, save, save!

It may be the first rest day of the Tour, but there’s no time to waste – Grab yourself a bargain with our summer cycling offer!!

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Click on the picture above to see our fantastic offer.

British Sports Book Awards – shortlist announced

Bloomsbury are pleased to announce that they have four titles in the shortlist for the Cross British Sports Books Awards this year.

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Alone: Triumph and Tragedy of John Curry by Bill Jones (Biography of the Year and Outstanding Sports Writing)

31-0 by James Montague (Football Book of the Year)

10 for 10: Hedley Verity and the Story of Cricket’s Greatest Bowling Feat by Chris Waters (Cricket Book of the Year)

Wisden on the Great War by A Renshaw (Cricket Book of the Year)

The Cross British Sports Book Awards takes place on 3rd June at Lords Cricket Ground and will be broadcast on SkySports.

Click here for more information: http://www.britishsportsbookawards.co.uk/2015/04/shortlists-announced-for-cross-british-sports-book-awards/

Nell McAndrew’s Guide to Running

Welcome to my guide to running. Whether you want to learn how to get started or – like me – you’re always looking for tips on how to get faster, I hope my book helps you achieve your goals.

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Running is my passion, it’s more than just a hobby. As a busy mum of two, it’s my stress relief and my favourite way to unwind. I’ve always loved the feeling exercise gives me. It makes me feel alive, energised and more confident. It also means I enjoy my food more and I don’t feel guilty about having treats like chocolate!

London Marathon 2012
London Marathon 2012

Exercise has become a way of life for me and I couldn’t live without it. Growing up in Leeds, Yorkshire, I was always sporty. At school I was on the netball team and tried karate for a while. I loved being active and trying new things but I was never particularly good at, or interested in, running at this time. Like many people, i think not being great at running whilst at school made me reluctant to try it when I was older. So instead throughout my twenties when I was working as a model, I kept fit at the gym and did workouts like those seen on my Peak Energy fitness DVDs. I would run on the treadmill or go for the odd run around the park, but it wasn’t until I signed up for the London Marathon in 2004 that I started to take running more seriously – and I haven’t looked back. It turns out I was much better at it than I thought! I was 30 then and ran my personal best (PB) time of 2 hours 54 minutes when I was 38. I achieved all my other PBs that year too (18 minutes 43 seconds for 5k, 29 minutes and 21 seconds for 5 miles, 36 minutes and 54 seconds for 10k and 1 hour and 21 minutes for the half marathon). So it just goes to show, it’s never too late to start or to improve. I’m now in my forties and I still believe I can run faster. I love the challenge of pushing myself to see what I can do.

Anyone who already has the running bug will know how fun and addictive it can be but it’s not always easy to get started, or to stay motivated. So I hope by sharing my passion for the sport, and what I’ve learnt along the way, can give you some support, encouragement and inspiration.

Running is fun and addictive!

Running is fun and addictive!

Since June 2012, I have enjoyed writing a monthly column for Women’s Running magazine outlining how I combine motherhood and training. I’ve always wanted to write a book and I’m delighted to finally put ‘pen to paper’ after joining forces with journalist Lucy Waterlow, a fellow running devotee. Lucy has interviewed me a number of times over the years and we bonded over our love of running and racing. This illustrates something else I love about the sport – no matter what your background or ability, you can always make friends through running. I love hearing about other people’s running experiences which is why I’ve included stories from Lucy and a number of runners in the book, alongside my own experiences and tips. I have been privileged to meet some of the best athletes, coaches, personal trainers and physiotherapists through keeping fit over the years and I have included some of their expertise here too. 

So what else can you expect from my guide to running? Well, in the first chapter, you’ll find advice on how you can get started and a 5k training plan for beginners. You don’t have to jump in the deep end and run a marathon straight away. There are plenty of 5k and 10k races on offer around the country every weekend so why not target one of those to get you going. The second chapter is all about how to add variety to your training to keep you interested, and how to get fitter and faster. There’s information on the variety of races you can do, and how to prepare for your perfect race and run a PB.

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I hope this book will encourage even more people to run regularly.

Dealing with an injury can sometimes be part of running so I’ve included a chapter with advice on how to avoid injury and how to deal with it should something happen. I love my food and aim to eat healthily as I’m aware how important nutrition is to running well. So information on the best foods to complement your training, along with an insight into my daily diet, is provided in the Food For Fuel chapter.  Then there’s a whole section Just For Women, covering topics such as dealing with your time of the month, how to keep running while pregnant (should you want to) and how to ease back into exercise safely after having a baby. Men are of course still welcome to read this section – it might help you understand what we’re going through!

Finally, if it’s the marathon you’re targeting, then chapter six is for you. There’s information on taking on the challenge of 26.2 miles, with race day tips and how I managed to achieve my aim of running a sub-three hour time. There’s also a number of inspirational stories from a variety of runners who explain what tackling the long distance meant for them. At the end of the book, you’ll find a pace chart and various training schedules for beginners to more experienced runners.
The running community is growing rapidly and I hope this book will encourage even more people to become part of it by running regularly. No matter what your age, background, gender or ability, running can be enjoyed by all.

Nell McAndrew

Decided to get fit and lean in 2015? Awesome!

By Julia Buckley

… But lets keep it real here – exercising is easy when you feel all fired up like you are now. Sooner or later though (usually around February) that January fitness fever will fizzle out. If you want to make sure those resolutions stick, you’re going to have to find it in yourself to keep going, ignore the excuses, and learn to get your workouts done whether you feel motivated in that moment or not.

It’s a tall order, but with the right strategy you can do it. Make a plan now for how you’ll think your way out of those excuses when they inevitably pop into your brain and you’ll be well on the way to making your fitness goals a reality.

Here’s how to quash a few of the most common resolution-killers:

I don’t feel like it today
We all have days when we don’t feel like exercising, the key is to get it done anyway. Just do 15 minutes, you’ll still get lots of benefits and you know you’ll be glad when that post-workout feeling hits you on the other side.

But if you’re ill or feel like you’ve been overtraining, of course, take rest.

I don’t have time
Really? Have you watched any TV lately? Read any books or magazines? Hung out with friends? … I’m not saying you should always be exercising instead of doing those things, but if you really want to get into shape, maybe it’s worth making getting your workout done a higher priority. A 15 minute workout is infinitely better than no workout at all. Get up 15 minutes earlier in the morning if that’s what it takes, or make it part of your day cycle to work, run around with the kids in the park, hit the gym at lunchtime. You may need to shift things around a little, but there will be a way you can fit 15 minutes into your day to take care of your body.

Why bother at my age? I’m too old!
No, you’re not. It’s always wise to get checked by a doctor before starting exercise and you’ll need to find a way of training that suits the condition of your body, but there will be something you can do to get fitter whatever your starting point.

Don’t go thinking that there’s no point either; yes, you might’ve missed your shot at the Olympics, but you can still get fitter, stronger and healthier and the benefits at any age can be immense

I’m not losing any weight so what’s the point in carrying on?
When people talk about wanting to lose weight, generally what they really mean is that they want to lose fat. It’s a pity fat has become such a dirty word, because this has led to a lot of misunderstanding which has been really unhelpful to a lot people’s health and fitness.

If you’re exercising hard and eating right, you’ll be gaining muscle. Muscle is obviously going to weigh something on your body, in fact, muscle actually weighs more than fat. So you could well be slimmer, firmer and leaner without the scales showing any change. This is one of the reasons I encourage people to take regular photographs for visual comparison and take measurements of their bodies.

I’m not a member of a gym
Well, you could join one, they’re not as scary as they look, I promise, and memberships are more affordable than ever. But you certainly don’t have to be a member of a gym to get fit. In my book The Fat Burn Revolution I’ve provided a 12-week fitness programme which has got thousands of people into great shape in their own homes.

I don’t like exercising on my own
So get a friend to do it with you or join a class. Or if that’s not an option, get online, there are literally thousands of people out there just waiting to support and encourage you. The list of sites and online communities are endless, for starters, come join my Fat Burn Revolution Facebook group. I’m completely biased of course, but if there’s a more friendly, supportive and inspiring online, I don’t know about it! Plus I pop by myself every day and try to answer as many posts as I can.

If you’re not a fan of Facebook, drop me a tweet anytime and I’ll be happy to cheer you on: @Julia_B.

 

Guest blog post by Julia Buckley, author of The Fat Burn Revolution

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Top Tips for Keeping your Fitness New Years Resolutions in Check

Keep your New Years Resolutions in check with some top tips from Gavin Morey, author of the Twelve Week Fitness and Nutrition Programme for Men and the Twelve Week Fitness and Nutrition Programme for women.

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Food basics
Leave the bread and pasta off of your shopping list. You would have heard this before but they are not that good for you and make your body retain water have which will in turn, make you feel and look bloated! Try leaving these out of your diet for one week and see how much weight / cm’s you have lost and how great you feel.

 

 

Healthy eating starts with healthy shopping
The key time to avoid shopping is when you’re hungry. Hungry shoppers put more in their trolleys especially naughty foods and sugary foods. Better to shop after a meal. This works to your advantage as you pick up slightly less and you will keep to your plan. Try it, you may be pleasantly surprised.

Sleep
Sleep is as important as eating and drinking, which is why we spend one third of our lives doing so. It is absolutely vital for maintaining normal levels of cognitive skills like speech and memory.

Eating out
Enjoy the odd meal out as it can help with weight loss. Reward yourself for reaching a goal and enjoy the company, this will reduce the feeling of deprivation. By trusting yourself to choose the right meal and turning down the bread basket reinforces your sense of self control.

Alcohol
When it comes to drinking alcohol the best advice is to drink ones that are most natural with low sugar, no artificial ingredients. Choose spirits over beer, red wine over white or rose wine, ale over beer.

water

Drink water
Water makes up two thirds of the weight of a human body of which your muscle consists of approximately 75% water. Water is as you know the most important nutrient for the body but how much is enough? It’s recommended between 1.5 to 3 litres a day depending on your size, shape and the amount of exercise you do daily.

 

 

Bad day, bad week? Don’t panic!
If you are having a bad day or even an entire week try not to panic! Limit the days as much as possible and DONT GIVE UP! If you can turn it around to eating the right foods you can actually lose more weight than actually put on in the first place.

Training – Keeping things fresh
Like with our food, we need to keep things interesting with our training. Whether you buy a new app, buy new clothing or change your fitness sessions all will encourage you to keep exercising and having fun.

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New to fitness
When you begin to work out for the first time or incorporating a new exercise routine it’s expected that your body will feel discomfort. This discomfort could be aching, stiffness or muscle soreness (also known as DOMS) that occurs as your body is being put under a new demand. So as you progressively increase the demand overtime your body will adapt and build it’s self up to become stronger physically (muscles) and physiologically (heart and lungs).

The importance of stretching
Stretching is just as important as exercise as it will lengthen your muscle, reduce the feeling of DOMS, promote circulation, increase performance and strength and aid in body awareness.

97814081963669781408196397Gavin Morey is the author of the Twelve Week Fitness and Nutrition Programme for Men and the Twelve Week Fitness and Nutrition Programme for Women.

New Year, New You 2015 #PeakPhysiqueChallenge

By Hollis Lance Liebman

Happy 2015!

It’s a brand new year. The slate is clean, the cache emptied and the reset button has been pushed. Now that you have your blueprint for success firmly in your hands, in Peak Physique, 2015 is finally going to be your breakthrough year.RH3A0220

It would seem every January is a somewhat reoccurring groundhog existence in your renewal and vows for a healthy lifestyle and physical excellence. In the days prior to January 1st, and of course with the holidays occurring, we often load up on processed foods in excess just before beginning our New Year’s Resolutions and thus our decision to reinvent ourselves for the coming new year.

And like many, what often occurs is failure and early failure at that. We simply set the bar too high and are too extreme in our methodologies and executions of arriving in peak shape. The result is often many attempting to cross the bridge, but few actually making it to the other side. Well, this year is going to be different. 2015 is the year of you!

These 10 tips will kick-start and help to ensure that 2015 will indeed be different. 2015 will be your break-through year in which a change of former habits will now result in desired and long sought after results.

1. EVENT PLANNING – The first step to the new-and-improved 2015 you is to clearly define your destination. Perhaps your goal is to be bikini or board short ready come the summer. Beginning in January will give you plenty of time to bring about a major change in your physique. Starting a journey without defining one’s destination is akin to driving the car to nowhere – you may never get there, when there is not defined.

2. AVOID SELF SABOTAGE – The voice that says you can’t is not telling the truth. Living in the era of instant gratification, it’s all too easy to self-medicate with sugar and fat-laden processed foods when feeling down or to skip a workout to feel at best temporarily better. The self-defeating voice can be silenced and you and you alone have the power to do so. You have the power to keep clean and nutritious foods stocked in your kitchen and you and you alone have the power to walk into any gym and give your all and improve your physique.

3. CLEAR THE WEAK LINKS – Be it a non-supportive friend or non-supportive garment, it is imperative to keep a team in your life that shares your goals, beliefs and methodologies. This goes a long way to actually getting your goals accomplished. Hanging with positive people that are also working on bettering themselves creates a safe and friendly, “got your back” atmosphere that is completely supportive. Trim the fat, not just from food, but also from your life.

4. THE MIRROR IS YOUR ONLY COMPETITION – Besting the image in the mirror is your foremost goal. Not starving or attempting to achieve by any means necessary the images that the media deems desirable. Since you only have control over yourself, it’s best to keep your focus there. 2015 is about adopting new positive lifestyle changes and making them work for you – over the long-term.

5. DON’T SHOOT FOR THE STARS – Many 2014 resolutions fell short of reaching the mark because they were too severe, too extreme and too unrealistic in terms of maintaining them with regularity for any length of time. While you should be looking to become your best, realize that it takes steps and time and a consistent, measured approach to achieve. Saying you will work out every day for hours and eat perfectly and not drink is simply too unrealistic. Better to say, I will have a few wonderful workouts per week, do my cardio and eat mostly clean with a splurge here and there. Youll be pleasantly surprised over the long-term how much more you will accomplish this way.

6. PACK AHEAD – You know the saying “failing to plan ahead is planning to fail.” Though most of us tend to live fast lifestyles today, leaving the house to go to work without packing foods to support your healthy lifestyle is almost sure to derail you. Taking the time each evening before work the next day to grill some chicken, steam some veggies and prepare some yams/sweet potato really doesn’t take too much time and will empower you in this all or nothing society we tend to exist in. By bringing meals with you, you are also less likely to eat poorly and skip gym sessions since you will be properly fueled for performance.

7. WORKOUT PARTNER – For many, a workout partner ups the ante and makes it a commitment. Someone else is depending on you to get a common goal accomplished, as a team. If you find someone who shares your common need of improvement, latch on to that person, and make it a double. A workout partner can even create a friendly sense of competition.

8. PHOTOS/CHECK-IN – For me it has always been about showing a clear-cut progression, and nothing says progress more than visual proof. Taking photos of yourself at the start of your transformation, although perhaps highly personal and sensitive, is an amazing tool to show improvement and sustain motivation well into the New Year. Today, take photos of yourself from the front, side and rear and then put them away. I guarantee you that 12 weeks later following the Peak Physique Challenge you will see non-refutable change that will make you beyond proud. Additionally, perhaps try on a garment that is tight or too constrictive at the start of your 12-week program. I also guarantee that it will fit better, sometimes far better after the completion of your 12-week program.

9. CHANGE – The same thing day in and day out can thwart goals and challenges. That is why, armed with change, you’re suiting up not for a sprint, but for a marathon – for the long-term. Be it a different outfit to the gym, a different routine, a different spice on your meal, make it desired and interesting. For some, seeing the almost weekly changes in the mirror or improvement in exercise performance is more than enough change to keep you motivated and progressing.

10. A PROMISE – To yourself that this year, 2015 will indeed be different. You will achieve more than you have before. You will best the image in the mirror. You will adopt a lifestyle, not a fad. It has helped some to make them accountable by posting on social media one’s goals. Saying you need and will make a change in writing is a lot more powerful than wanting and trying to make said change. Your word, in the end, it’s all we have. Make your words turn into actions that count and make a difference.

2015 is about becoming the change you have always wanted to be. Now that you have Peak Physique firmly in your corner, you are not alone. You have a plan and most importantly, you have yourself. The creation of Peak Physique was my own challenge and call-to-action to get myself into top shape (it had been a while), and then to help lead others on this amazing journey to self-transformation.

We want to see your transformations. Post on social media #peakphysiquechallenge to show your progress and inspire others. Remember, transformations do come true, it just depends on how much you want them. Make it so.

Hollis Lance Liebman is the author of Peak Physique. Buy your copy today.

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