Author Archives: Kirsty

Celebrate the Commonwealth Games

9781472907325 9781472902160 9781408843758

30% off selected sports books from Bloomsbury

Browse our books and discover a wealth of sporting information on the games and the athletes who take part. From sports journalist Brian Oliver’s new book The Commonwealth Games, which brings the games to life with stories of the athletes who have competed over the years; to Podium a fantastic book that reveals the attributes and influences that are needed to become a champion and bring home gold. We have every book for the sporting fan.
Offer valid until 3rd August 2014.

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A Great Vintage: Merckx 69

We don’t like to boast, but, well, some of our  books are just so bloomin’ great that we can’t help but sing their praises. And for this beaut, we’ve borrowed some words from people who’ve beaten us to it…

‘MILLIONS upon millions of words have been written on Eddy Merckx over the decades and it will get to the point soon when there is nothing new to say, which is possibly why Bloomsbury came up with the interesting idea of revisiting a year in the life of cycling’s nonpareil with a series of documentary type photographs. As all my snapper friends constantly remind me a great image is always worth a thousand words. Damn them, but they are right.

Not any old year mind and not any old photos. 1969 was an incredible career defining 12-months for Merckx while the project collaborators Tonny Strouton and Jan Maes boldy opt for a montage of huge black and white snaps when presumably there are plenty of fine colour shots available if desired. A great black and white image is worth 10,000 words in my opinion because they instantly convey and historical importance and almost timelessness which makes it easier to relive that moment.

Merckx 69 will stretch the budget but I suspect will prove irresistible for any serious collector of cycling books. Just as the man himself had to win every race – or at least try – Merckx fans tend to be ‘completests’ and their ‘Merckx corner’ of the bookshelf will look bare without this mighty tome.’
Brendan Gallagher, The Tour

Merckx (69) and Merckx 69

Merckx (69) and Merckx 69 (© JAMES ARTHUR/PHOTONEWS)

‘featuring some utterly fabulous, grainy, black and white photographs from eddy’s 1969 season, tentatively holding your breath and opening the first few pages brings to mind nothing more or less than a pristine copy of rouleur magazine. you can argue the case for e-books all you like, there’s simply nothing to match the heady aroma of printer’s ink on heavy art paper. the photos are not only glorious, fascinating, engaging and addictive, but undoubtedly the very reason you’d part with your £35 in the first place.
this is an absolute doozy, one that will continue to offer those rouleur moments for ever and ever and ever.’
thewashingmachinepost.com

Sports Calender: June

How is it June already?! Fortunately, there’s plenty of sport to help keep you entertained while you get over the shock of it almost being midsummer’s day…

CRICKET
12th-16th First Test Match England v Sri Lanka
20th-24th Second Test Match England v Sri Lanka

TENNIS
9th-15th Aegeon Championship Queen’s Club, Baron’s Court, London
23rd-6th July Wimbledon Championships, Wimbledon

GOLF
12th-15th US Open, Pinehurst, North Carolina

MOTORSPORT
8th Canadian Grand Prix
22nd Austrian Grand Prix
14th-15th Le Mans 24hr

FOOTBALL
12-13th July
2014 FIFA World Cup, Brasil

POLO
15th Cartier Queens Cup, Windsor Great Park

 

Ever wondered a bit about the history of professional sport and the ingredients that magnetise millions around the globe? Well, if you fancy a spot of reading about the marvels of spectator sport, then look no further than Floodlights and Touchlines. It tells the stories that matter: from the gladiators of Rome to the runners of Rift Valley via the innovator-missionaries of Rugby School; from multi-faceted British exports to the Americanisation of professionalism and the Indianisation of cricket. Rob Steen traces the development of these sports which captivate the turnstile millions and the mouse-clicking masses, addressing their key themes and common links, from creation myths to match fixing via race, politics, sexuality and internationalism.

If you don’t believe me, why not read some of the great reviews it’s received already…

In his deftly-written and engrossing new book, Rob Steen reminds us again why, beneath the floodlights and along the touchlines, sport has consumed so many of us for so long. It’s as compelling as your favourite sporting memory – and more informative and amusing.
Donald McRae, The Guardian

Rob Steen is the wittiest and most astringent English-language sportswriter. And this book provides a brilliant narrative of spectator sport. Internationalist, progressive, cosmopolitan, yet earthy, it is an instant classic.
Toby Miller, author of SportSex

I believe that you will never fully understand the game behind the game without reading Floodlights and Touchlines. Rob Steen is the perfect guide to take you through this remarkable history.
Dr John Carlos, 1968 Olympian, medal stand protester

Rob Steen’s intoxication with sport’s dramatic qualities, his familiarity with the sporting scene on both sides of the Atlantic and his writing verve all shine through in this penetrating study.
Nick Pitt, The Sunday Times

Rob’s obstinate belief that sport and thought are not incompatible is an inspiration to us all.
Simon Barnes, Chief Sportswriter for The Times

Floodlights and Touchlines is a triumph. People who dismiss sports as mindless entertainment need to read this. People who love sports but find their ardor doesn’t extend beyond the numbers, need to read this as well. The sports world is better for its publication.
Dave Zirin, Sports Editor of The Nation and author of Brazil’s Dance with the Devil

Floodlights and Touchlines: Out now

Floodlights and Touchlines: Out now

For more info, or if you want to get your hands on a copy to read in between world cup matches and the tennis, click here.

 

Offer: Score 30% off our football books

Football banner

Get a kick out of these fantastic football books

As all eyes are on Brazil at the moment, back here in the UK we are offering 30% off all our football books! Brush up on your refereeing skills with the fantastic You Are the Ref and discover the story behind the coolest international football team in history in Danish Dynamite.

Offer ends 13th July 2014
 
football

 

Health & Fitness Catalogue 2014 #sportsbooks

I expect you’ve been wondering when this little beauty was going to come along, and here it is …
The 2014 Health & Fitness Books catalogue.
It’s got our greatest hits, our newest chart-toppers as well as some stalwart classics.

Sit back, browse and enjoy…

Click on me to see inside

Click on me to see inside

Brought to you courtesy of Bloomsbury Sport. You’re welcome.

How to Eat for Maximum Performance

Guest post by Anita Bean

Whether you are a competitive athlete looking for those ‘marginal gains’ or you simply enjoy working out for fitness, a great nutrition plan will help maximise your performance. It can help you train harder and longer, and speed your recovery between sessions. Here are a few tips to keep you well fuelled:

1. Fuel upStirfry

Of all the foods you could have before a workout, prioritize ones rich in carbohydrates, especially if you will be training for longer than one hour. Include some protein (chicken, fish, cheese, egg, beans) as well as a small amount of fat (olive oil, cheese, avocado) in the meal. Both help lower the overall glycaemic index (a measur
e of how rapidly the blood sugar levels rise) of the meal, provide sustained energy and improve performance. A meat and veg stew with potatoes; a pasta, tuna (or bean) and veg bake; or a chicken & veg stir-fry with rice would be ideal.

2. Eat 2 – 3 hours before exercising

The optimal time for your pre-exercise meal is 2 – 4 hours before training. If you work-out at 7pm, plan to eatbananas between 3 and 5pm. No time to eat a meal? A granola bar; a slice of toast with peanut butter; a handful of nuts and dried fruit; or a banana 30 minutes before you train should give you enough of an energy boost.

3. Begin well-hydrated

It’s important to begin each workout properly hydrated if you want to put in a good performance. Aim to drink 5-7 ml of fluid per kilogram of body weight about 4 hours before exercise – equivalent to 350 – 490 ml for a 70kg person.

4. Avoid dehydration

waterIf you’re exercising for less than an hour, there’s no need to consume anything other than water during your workout. For most conditions 400 – 800 ml per hour will prevent dehydration as well as over-hydration. Listen to your body and drink when you are thirsty.

5. Fuel on the go

If you’re working-out for longer than an hour, consuming carbohydrate either in the form of a drink or as food provides your muscles with a ready supply of blood glucose for immediate energy. This spares glycogen stores and helps you to train longer. Aim for 30–60 g of carbohydrate per hour – equivalent to 400 – 800 ml cordial (diluted 1 to 6), or an isotonic sports drink; 2 bananas or 50g dried fruit. If you’re exercising hard for longer than 2 – 3 hours, a dual energy source drink (glucose and fructose) may help increase your stamina.

6. Replace fluids

Weigh yourself before and after your session to get an idea of your fluid losses. The International Olympic Committee recommend drinking 600 – 750 ml of fluid for each 0.5 kg weight lost.

7. Refuel

fruit and yoghurtIf you plan to exercise again within 24 hours, begin refuelling within two hours of your workout. Your recovery snack should contain carbohydrate to replenish depleted fuel (glycogen) stores, as well as 20 – 25g protein to repair and rebuild the muscles. Milk (all types), flavoured milk and low fat milk shakes are ideal, or make your own recovery shake from milk, fruit and yoghurt. If you don’t plan to exercise the next day, simply ensure you get enough protein and carbs over the next 24 hours.

 

Food for Fitness 4th Ed

 

Food for Fitness 4th ed by Anita Bean

The new edition of this book is the ultimate resource for anyone who is serious about sport or fitness. It has been updated to include the very latest nutrition research for exercise and performance. Food For Fitness dispels popular myths and gives you the tools you need to reach your maximum performance, as well as 65 easy, delicious recipes, and sport-specific menu plans.

 

 

Sporting Calender: April

Happy April, everyone. Hope you’ve all survived April Fools day. Who knew the Bloomsbury Sport’s ski trip to Holland was just a ruse?!

Starting this month, Bloomsbury Sport will be aiming to keep you up to date with the month’s upcoming sports events, with maybe the cheeky odd plug for some of our great sports titles. And it’s a bumper month to start with; April literally showers us with sports…

APRIL

HORSE RACINGk3453368
5th Grand National, Aintree

ROWING
6th The Boat Race, Putney to Mortlake

ATHLETICS
6th Paris Marathon
13th London Marathon

GOLF
10th-13th The Masters, AugustaGolfTeeGrass
Ever wondered what golf would have been like back in the day? Written in 1914, Batchelor’s Golf Stories pre-dates the Masters, evoking the inherent wit, intemperance and pratfalls of golf.

MOTORSPORT
6th Bahrain Grand Prix
20th Chinese Grand Prix

CRICKET
6th World Twenty20 Final, Mirpur, Bangladesh
We don’t like cricket … We love it. Wisden Cricketer’s Almanack 2014 has just published, so make sure you get yourself a copy of this yellow bundle of cricketing joy.

FOOTBALL
12-13th
FA Cup Semi  Finals, Wembley1197103862376117882Gioppino_Soccer_Ball.svg.hi

SNOOKER
19th -5th May World Championship, The Crucible

New release: The Bloomsbury Companion to the Philosophy of Sport

And now for something completely different…

PHILOSOPHY AND SPORT might not appear immediately to be obvious bedfellows, but sport has often captured both the intellectual and personal imagination of innumerable philosophers throughout the ages. From Albert Camus’ love of football, and time playing as goalkeeper for Racing Universitaire d’Alger (spawning the famous declaration that: “after many years during which I saw many things, what I know most surely about morality and the duty of man I owe to sport and learned it in the RUA”) to Jacques Derrida’s notoriously perplexing and gnomic formulation “there is nothing beyond the touchline” (neither certainty nor truth, just le terrain and le foot)—philosophy and sport have often been entangled in an intersectional and productive relationship.

The Bloomsbury Companion to the Philosophy of Sport features specially commissioned essays from a team of leading international scholars. The book, by providing an overview of the advances in the philosophical understanding of sport (and related practices), serves as a measure of the development of the philosophy of sport, but it also constitutes an expression of the discipline’s state of the art status. The book includes a critical analysis of the historical development of philosophic ideas about sport, three essays on the research methods typically used by sport philosophers, twelve essays that address vital issues at the forefront of key research areas, as well as four essays on topics of future disciplinary concern. The book also includes a glossary of key terms and concepts, an essay on resources available to researchers and practitioners, an essay on careers opportunities in the discipline, and an extensive annotated bibliography of key literature.

 9781408182574

‘Drawing on the very best scholars, this volume provides the intellectual foundations for a philosophy of sport from four major intellectual philosophical traditions – the Analytic, the Continental, the Eastern and Pragmatism. This volume is essential reading for anyone desiring a comprehensive philosophical understanding of the phenomenon that plays such a major part of our lives.’
Norman E. Bowie, Professor Emeritus, University of Minnesota, USA.

‘This excellent collection of specially written articles is organized in a n innovative way, combining a comprehensive account of the history and the research methodology of the philosophy of sport with the critical reflections on current theoretical issues and future developments in the area.’
Claudio M. Tamburrini, Senior Researcher, Stockholm University, Sweden.

The Outspoken Cyclist meets Rouleur

Click hereThe Outspoken Cyclists‘s Diane Lees interviews Ian Cleverly and Robert Wyatt from Rouleur to discuss the Rouleur Centenary Tour de France.

Click on the radio to have a listen…

David Moyes Is The Right Man, But Only If…

David_Moyes_MUFC_2013When the news broke that Sir Alex Ferguson was stepping down as manager of Manchester United and the name of his successor was revealed the following day, I was one of those who claimed that David Moyes was the logical and right choice. I expressed this belief on Danish television only minutes after Moyes had been officially “chosen”, but as it happens, I did in fact already indicate in the book Standing on the Shoulders of Giants that Moyes was the best bet, at least in terms of British candidates for the most impossible job in the world. But (and there is a “but” which has become only more visible in hindsight) I forgot to mention that Moyes being “the right choice” came with a precondition. The name of that precondition was René Meulensteen.

When it became clear in the course of July that Moyes had indeed made a clean cut and released Ferguson’s entire staff, I thus immediately felt the dark clouds assembling above Old Trafford. Ferguson is from Scotland, and so is Moyes. No problem in that. On the contrary, if one knows the history of Manchester United one also knows that the two most successful managers – Alex Ferguson and Matt Busby – are both Scots, and, apart from that, they both occupied the Old Trafford hot seat through more than twenty-five years. These facts, the Scottish connection and continuity, are some of the reasons why Moyes was the right and logical choice. In short, Manchester United have a deep love for both Scots and continuity, and this is why they not only chose Moyes, but also chose to give him a six-year contract. So far so good.

But in the wake of the fabulous Treble-winning season of 1999, a season where the Red Devils had shown what one could rightly label an uncompromising, but at times also naive all-out-attack mentality, Ferguson realised that the United engine was in urgent need of a continental component who could provide the team with tactical finesse and new training methods, since United were being punished in Europe for a similar tactic in the following season. In other words, Ferguson went looking for a new assistant manager to replace Steve McLaren, who after the Champions League final against Bayern Munich in 1999 went his own way. Ferguson found the cosmopolitan Portuguese Carlos Queiroz, and later he hired the Dutchman Meulensteen. With their schooling in the Portuguese and Dutch football philosophy respectively, Queiroz and Meulensteen brought elements of technical flair, tactical flexibility and strategic intelligence into the United team. Neither must we forget that Queiroz, apart from his technical, tactical and strategic inputs, also kept his fellow countryman Cristiano Ronaldo happy, just as Meulensteen kept his fellow countryman Robin van Persie happy in the latter’s first season at Old Trafford. The importance in relation to man management of having a staff with a multinational composition is not to be underestimated in this era of globalized squads.

When Moyes led Meulensteen go, what did he then do? In contrast to the master, who had realised the need for a continental ingredient in Manchester United’s English and Celtic core, the apprentice brought with him Britishness, Britishness and Britishness. Worst case scenario for a United fan is indeed that Moyes quite simply brought Everton from Goodison Park to Old Trafford. The signs of this have been clear in several matches. But perhaps they were most unambiguous, and symbolically so, in the match against the very Everton team Moyes only abandoned a few months ago. With Roberto Martinez at the helm Everton not only dominated in large periods of the game against Manchester United at Old Trafford, they also secured their victory in what came close to being Fergie Time – that specific period of the match when United historically have excelled in pushing their opponents further and further up the Stretford End and scoring late winners.

Maybe I am too harsh on Moyes. Maybe I underestimate his own tactical intelligence. But I do fear another post-Busby era. Is that too pessimistic? Is it an untimely premonition (untimely because as a United fan one is committed to give Moyes a chance and committed to thinking long term)? Perhaps too pessimistic and untimely, yes, but Meulensteen’s exit was a bad decision. If it was a catastrophically bad decision, only time will tell.

And I guess we could leave it here, hanging in the air in good postmodern fashion. But there is a merciless point that we cannot neglect, namely that seven years are longer today than they were in 1986. And that is not all. It is also much more fatal for a club today to fall out of top 4 than it was then, not just because of financial reasons, but especially because it influences a club’s ability to attract players from the top-top shelf negatively. The consequence is a vicious circle which is almost impossible to break. Just look at Liverpool.

Buy nowSøren Frank is the author of a brand new book about Manchester United entitled Standing On The Shoulders Of Giants. The book was recently reviewed by World Soccer Talk.

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