Author Archives: Naomi

How to Avoid Injuries During the London Marathon

The London Marathon is just around the corner, you’ve been training for months, you’ve ironed your best and tightest running bottoms, and you’re determined not to embarrass yourself in front of friends, family and live TV. So what can stop you now you ask?!

Did you know that 28% of runners never make it to the starting line due to injury? And that on the day, a further 2% (about 500 runners) don’t finish the race due to injuries? We know that at this point it’s far too late to change anything drastic, but we’ve been dipping into John Shepherd’s fantastic Strength Training for Runners to find a few handy tips to stop those last-minute niggles.

Pre-conditioning:

‘Prevention in the case of running injuries, is very much better than cure’. Wiser words were never spoken, and in aid of preventing running injures John Shepherd recommends this great selection of resistance exercises for pre-conditioning training:

Pre-conditioning

Warming up:

A running-specific warm-up will raise your body temperature, improve your range of movement and get you mentally ready for the task ahead! These are all fairly vital, so we thought we’d chuck in some of John Shepherd’s very own advised warm-ups to help you on your way:

Warming up

 

Stretching, obviously, but concentrate on sites of previous injury:

Stretching everything properly is vital, but if you’ve had an injury before in a specific area, like the hamstring, it is vital to make sure that area is fully prepared. As John Shepherd points out:

‘In terms of learning from previous injuries, a team of researchers investigated hamstring injuries in elite athletes, hypothesising that those with a prior history of hamstring muscle strain were at increased risk of sustaining similar injuries in the future.’

So, if you have any previous niggles in important areas, make sure those areas are properly stretched out and warmed up before you head for the starting line.

 Order your copy today

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Meet Michael Hutchinson and Discover the Obsession, Science and Luck Behind the World’s Fastest Cyclists

Discover the Obsession, Science and Luck Behind the World’s Fastest Cyclists

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Michael Hutchinson is obsessed with speed. He will be here at the Bloomsbury Institute on 6th May to tell us about his new book, Faster, and explain why cyclists do what they do, what the riders, their coaches and the boffins get up to behind the scenes, and why the idea of going faster is such an appealing, universal instinct for all of us.

Fantastic. An intelligent and personal insight in to the world of elite cycling’ Sir Dave Brailsford

Book your tickets today!

Listen to Julia Buckley talk to KFKA’s Devon Lentz about her new book The Fat Burn Revolution

Click on the book cover below to listen to Julia Buckley talk to KFKA’s Devon Lentz about her new book The Fat Burn Revolution.

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The Fat Burn Revolution

Meet author Julia Buckley as she talks about her new book The Fat Burn Revolution

The Fat Burn Revolution publishes on the 2nd January 2014.

Parc des Princes for the finish in Paris, 1951. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day

Stage 21


Finish in sight

The peloton swings into a packed Parc des Princes for the traditional finish of the Tour in 1951. Hugo Koblet, second from the left, made it two Tour victories in a row for Switzerland, following Ferdi Kübler’s win in 1950.

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These photos can be found on page 75 of Tour de France 100.

Poor Alps road surface during the 1920 Tour. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day


Stage 20

Alpine tracks
Léon Scieur in the Alps on his way to winning stage 11, between Grenoble and Gex, during the 1920 Tour. The picture acts as a stark illustration of the poor quality of the road surfaces at the time.

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These photos can be found on page 39 of Tour de France 100.

The Alps during the 1913 Tour. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day


Stage 19

Hairpin hell
Jean Alavoine and Firmin Lambot climb the Alpine monster, the Col du Galibier, during the 1913 Tour.

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These photos can be found on page 27 of Tour de France 100.

The most famous Alpe d’Huez finish of all: LeMond and Hinault in ‘86. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day


Stage 18

Burying the hatchet
Bernard Hinault and Greg LeMond cross the finish line at the top of Alpe d’Huez, united at last after two weeks of bitter feuding.

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These photos can be found on page 153 of Tour de France 100.

Fausto Coppi was also a great time triallist, seen here in 1949. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day

Stage 17

Velvet smoothness
The rider known as Il Campionissimo (champion of champions), Fausto Coppi, in full flight during the 1949 Tour, the first of his two victories. Coppi was arguably the first ‘modern’ cyclist, and, as far as some are concerned, the ultimate stylist. He and his great rival, Gino Bartali, scored an Italian one-two in this Tour, with ‘Il Pio’ (the pious), second.

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These photos can be found on page 70 of Tour de France 100.

Jean-Francois Bernard won in Gap, today’s finish town, in 1986 #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day

Stage 16
Tan lines

Another piece of history was made by Shelley Verses, the American soigneur with the French Toshiba squad. Verses was believed to be the first woman to work for a team, first coming with the 7-Eleven squad in 1986. On the massage table, studying the results sheet, is Jean-François Bernard, who was tipped as Hinault’s successor but could not emulate the Badger.

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These photos can be found on page 159 of Tour de France 100.
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