Category Archives: Complete Guides

Sports Nutrition Advice from Bestselling Author Anita Bean

Guest Post by Anita Bean, Author of The Complete Guide to Sports Nutrition.

Recovery Nutrition

9781408174579

Proper nutritional recovery is vital to performance. Failure to replenish fluids and fuel after training can quickly result in sore muscles, fatigue and under-performance at your next training session. Here’s how to promote full recovery after a hard session:

Priority 1: Replace fluids

Your muscles cannot fully recover until your cells are properly hydrated. So make drinking your priority – start drinking while stretching, before you’ve showered. The exact amount you need to drink depends on how dehydrated you are after your workout. The ‘pee test’ will give you an idea how dehydrated you are, otherwise weigh yourself before and after training.  For each 0.5 kg (1 lb approx) of body weight lost, drink 600 – 750 ml of fluid (e.g. water, diluted juice or squash, milk – but not all in one go.

Drink little and often – I suggest 100 – 150 ml every 10 or 15 minutes over the next hour or so until your urine is very pale yellow.

Priority 2: Refuel  

You need to replace the fuel (carbs) that you’ve used otherwise you will feel sore, achey and tired during your next session.

Take advantage of the 30-minute window: This is when your muscles restock energy levels faster than normal.  The sooner you supply your muscles with carbs and protein after training, the quicker they will repair and rebuild. So have your recovery drink/ snack ready in your kit bag or in the car to eat on your journey home.

Eat carbs with protein: To help the body repair and rebuild, you need carbs with protein in a ratio of 3: 1. Ideally you should consume approx 20g protein. You can achieve this either in the form of drink (milk) or food (see below). You don’t need commercial recovery drinks

Opt for a milk drink: Milk, flavoured milk and milk shakes are near-perfect recovery drinks. Research shows that all types of milk after training speed up fuel recovery, encourage muscle gain and even reduce muscle soreness after training. They also help rehydrate the body more effectively than sports drinks, according to recent studies. Opt for whole, semi or skimmed milk; ready-to-drink milk shakes or make your own yoghurt smoothie from fruit, yoghurt and milk OR milk shake powder and milk.

Here are some ideas for post-workout snacks supplying 20g protein:

  • 500ml of milk or milkshake plus a banana
  • 250ml milk or milkshake plus 2 pots of fruit yoghurt
  • 500ml milk or milkshake plus an oat-based bar or flapjack
  • 200ml milk or milkshake plus 1 pot yoghurt plus 1 slice of toast and honey
  • Homemade milk shake: Blend 1 cup milk, 1 banana, 1 pot yogurt, 1 tbsp chopped walnuts, 1 scoop chocolate milkshake powder and 6 to 8 ice cubes
  • Fruit yoghurt smoothie: whizz together 2 pots of yoghurt, 1 banana or a handful or berries and 150ml fruit juice in a blender
  • 50g nuts (e.g. almonds or cashews) plus 2 pots of yoghurt

Anita Bean is also the author of the following titles:

9781408124543 9781408114070 9780713682601 9780713682595 9780713681284

Runner’s Knee, Tennis Elbow, Skier’s Thumb?

When it comes to sport and exercise, “No pain, no gain” may be a catchy phrase, but pain can often be the first warning sign of an injury so it’s important to listen to your body.

  To be on the right track in regards to managing treatment whether it be for ankle sprains, shin splints, groin pain, slipped discs or torn hamstrings, it’s worth checking out The Complete Guide to Sports Injuries by Christopher M. Norris.

 

 

The book is packed full of helpful photographs and diagrams to aid both understanding and technique in treating sports injuries, with practical guidance on massage, taping, hot and cold. Norris also gives great advice on structuring rehabilitation through exercise therapy to help with recovery through the healing process.

If you’re a sports coach, fitness instructor, student, physiotherapist or sports massage therapist, then this is the ideal introduction to understanding and treating sports injuries.

 

Pumping Iron

It might look like a cannonball with a handle or a ridiculously heavy metal handbag, but, for those in the know, the kettlebell is an essential piece of fitness equipment.

Originating from Russia, kettlebell training is now a global phenomenon with clubs, gyms and individuals investing in equipment and training. Celebs such as Penelope Cruz and Sylvester Stallone are reported to be big fans, but what can kettlebells be used for?

Well, kettlebells can be used for a variety of purposes including weight loss, improving coordination and anaerobic fitness and strengthening your core muscles.

Perfect. But how do you use them?

It’s your lucky day. Published this October, Allan Collins The Complete Guide to Kettlebell Training is a comprehensive guide to this popular fitness tool, providing practical tips on how to use and get the best out of training with a kettlebell.

I know what I’ll be asking for for Christmas.

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