Category Archives: Cycling

A Great Vintage: Merckx 69

We don’t like to boast, but, well, some of our  books are just so bloomin’ great that we can’t help but sing their praises. And for this beaut, we’ve borrowed some words from people who’ve beaten us to it…

‘MILLIONS upon millions of words have been written on Eddy Merckx over the decades and it will get to the point soon when there is nothing new to say, which is possibly why Bloomsbury came up with the interesting idea of revisiting a year in the life of cycling’s nonpareil with a series of documentary type photographs. As all my snapper friends constantly remind me a great image is always worth a thousand words. Damn them, but they are right.

Not any old year mind and not any old photos. 1969 was an incredible career defining 12-months for Merckx while the project collaborators Tonny Strouton and Jan Maes boldy opt for a montage of huge black and white snaps when presumably there are plenty of fine colour shots available if desired. A great black and white image is worth 10,000 words in my opinion because they instantly convey and historical importance and almost timelessness which makes it easier to relive that moment.

Merckx 69 will stretch the budget but I suspect will prove irresistible for any serious collector of cycling books. Just as the man himself had to win every race – or at least try – Merckx fans tend to be ‘completests’ and their ‘Merckx corner’ of the bookshelf will look bare without this mighty tome.’
Brendan Gallagher, The Tour

Merckx (69) and Merckx 69

Merckx (69) and Merckx 69 (© JAMES ARTHUR/PHOTONEWS)

‘featuring some utterly fabulous, grainy, black and white photographs from eddy’s 1969 season, tentatively holding your breath and opening the first few pages brings to mind nothing more or less than a pristine copy of rouleur magazine. you can argue the case for e-books all you like, there’s simply nothing to match the heady aroma of printer’s ink on heavy art paper. the photos are not only glorious, fascinating, engaging and addictive, but undoubtedly the very reason you’d part with your £35 in the first place.
this is an absolute doozy, one that will continue to offer those rouleur moments for ever and ever and ever.’
thewashingmachinepost.com

World Congress of Cycling Science

Cycling ScienceAre Tour de France champions born or made? Should cyclists strength train? How can pain become gain? What are the real benefits of contemporary sports nutrition? And – bottom line – can sports science help make race winners?

These are a few of the questions that a gathering of world leading sports scientists, coaches and medical practitioners aim to address at the UCI-endorsed 2nd World Congress of Cycling Science at the Rose Bowl in Leeds from Wednesday 2nd to Thursday 3rd of July, just days before the city hosts the Grand Depart of the Tour de France (Saturday 5th July).

The conference is organised by the University of Kent’s School of Sports and Exercise Science, which is headed by Professor Louis Passfield and Dr James Hopker, two of Great Britain’s leading names in the field. The conference has so far attracted representatives from the likes of UCI Pro Tour teams Garmin-Sharp, BMC, Francais des Jeux, Movistar and Omega Pharma Quickstep.

Integrating the various aspects of coaching, sports science, medicine, technology and performance, the Congress will provide a forum for the discussion of performance enhancement with a focus on the Tour itself. Speakers and participants include former riders turned coaches Charly Wegelius (Garmin-Sharp) and Marco Pinotti (BMC Pro Cycling Team), with other special guests to be announced.

As part of the Congress SRM are sponsoring a Keynote presentation where Uli Schoberer and a current Pro Tour rider (tbc), will discuss the use of power meters in professional cycling. SRM will also be exhibiting PowerMeters, PowerControls and cycle ergometers at the Congress.

Professor Passfield, previously a sports scientist with the Great Britain Cycling Team, said that the aim of the conference is “to further the use of science in cycling and to help share relevant information with coaches and sports scientists. The conference programme is designed to stimulate and inspire future collaboration and research-informed practice for the benefit of a new generation of cyclists”.

Further information about the Congress, speakers and how to book is available at www.wcss2014.co.uk. Alongside the Congress, there will also be a free evening event for up to 250 members of the public on the Thursday evening. Further information on the evening event and to book a place visit www.wcss2014.co.uk.

Dr James Hopker is the author of Performance Cycling.

9781408146514

Meet Michael Hutchinson and Discover the Obsession, Science and Luck Behind the World’s Fastest Cyclists

Discover the Obsession, Science and Luck Behind the World’s Fastest Cyclists

Hutchinson-Ireland_0210

Michael Hutchinson is obsessed with speed. He will be here at the Bloomsbury Institute on 6th May to tell us about his new book, Faster, and explain why cyclists do what they do, what the riders, their coaches and the boffins get up to behind the scenes, and why the idea of going faster is such an appealing, universal instinct for all of us.

Fantastic. An intelligent and personal insight in to the world of elite cycling’ Sir Dave Brailsford

Book your tickets today!

The Outspoken Cyclist meets Rouleur

Click hereThe Outspoken Cyclists‘s Diane Lees interviews Ian Cleverly and Robert Wyatt from Rouleur to discuss the Rouleur Centenary Tour de France.

Click on the radio to have a listen…

Listen In: Graeme Obree Interview with BikeRadar

Click here to check out the great interview on BikeRadar as Graeme Obree talks about his book The Obree Way.

Bike Radar

An Evening with Graeme Obree

As soon as we’d tweeted about the Bloomsbury Institute Evening with Graeme Obree to celebrate the publication of The Obree Way, tickets sold out quicker than for a One Direction concert.

Last night an audience of cyclists and Obree fans gathered to hear the great man interviewed by journalist Richard Moore. An hour didn’t seem enough – 60 minutes to cover such a varied career – the world records, the World Championships, the UCI, the movie of his life, the highs, the lows, the Beastie… With Richard at the tiller the audience were guided through Graeme’s career, and his own inimitable take on cycling, life and motivation.

IMG_6674

Publisher Charlotte Croft, cycling legend Graeme Obree and sports journalist Richard Moore

Graeme pulls no punches – his refusal to enter the doping programme for Le Groupement lost him his professional cycling career (and the shortest pro contract ever at 11 hours in total from signing it to being kicked off, he laughed…), but he winningly argued that come what may, he retains his self-respect and pride in his decision. Asked about the UCI he was winningly supportive – while their decision-making damaged his career he argued that it pushed him on to continue innovating, and also that without their volunteers and officials cycling events simply wouldn’t happen. Asked what his greatest wish for cycling was he used the opportunity to despair at the lack of support for women’s cycling – and especially a women’s Tour de France.

It was a fascinating opportunity to hear from a cycling legend – an iconoclast and innovator who has pushed the boundaries throughout his career.

IMG_6705

Graeme takes time out to chat with his fans

IMG_6679

Two great Scots


Post by Charlotte Croft, Head of Sport

3404 kilometres, 21 stages, 21 stories? It must be the new ‘Rouleur Centenary Tour de France’

PrintWith just under a month to go before we publish it, I thought I’d let our cycling fans have a sneaky peak at the new photographic book by Rouleur.

For the 100th running of the Tour de France, top cycling magazine Rouleur sent seven writers and photographers on the road at the Tour, each given three stages to record their individual takes on the race. Rouleur Centenary Tour de France captures these stories and provides a fascinating look at the race.

Out 7th November, it’ll make a nifty Christmas present for the lycra lovers among us.

« 3,404 kilometres »   « 21 stages »   « 21 stories »

Rouleur: Century Tour de France

Rouleur: Century Tour de France

 

Parc des Princes for the finish in Paris, 1951. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day

Stage 21


Finish in sight

The peloton swings into a packed Parc des Princes for the traditional finish of the Tour in 1951. Hugo Koblet, second from the left, made it two Tour victories in a row for Switzerland, following Ferdi Kübler’s win in 1950.

9781408170960

These photos can be found on page 75 of Tour de France 100.

Poor Alps road surface during the 1920 Tour. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day


Stage 20

Alpine tracks
Léon Scieur in the Alps on his way to winning stage 11, between Grenoble and Gex, during the 1920 Tour. The picture acts as a stark illustration of the poor quality of the road surfaces at the time.

9781408170960

These photos can be found on page 39 of Tour de France 100.

The Alps during the 1913 Tour. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day


Stage 19

Hairpin hell
Jean Alavoine and Firmin Lambot climb the Alpine monster, the Col du Galibier, during the 1913 Tour.

9781408170960

These photos can be found on page 27 of Tour de France 100.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,201 other followers

%d bloggers like this: