Category Archives: Cycling

Meet Michael Hutchinson and Discover the Obsession, Science and Luck Behind the World’s Fastest Cyclists

Discover the Obsession, Science and Luck Behind the World’s Fastest Cyclists

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Michael Hutchinson is obsessed with speed. He will be here at the Bloomsbury Institute on 6th May to tell us about his new book, Faster, and explain why cyclists do what they do, what the riders, their coaches and the boffins get up to behind the scenes, and why the idea of going faster is such an appealing, universal instinct for all of us.

Fantastic. An intelligent and personal insight in to the world of elite cycling’ Sir Dave Brailsford

Book your tickets today!

The Outspoken Cyclist meets Rouleur

Click hereThe Outspoken Cyclists‘s Diane Lees interviews Ian Cleverly and Robert Wyatt from Rouleur to discuss the Rouleur Centenary Tour de France.

Click on the radio to have a listen…

Listen In: Graeme Obree Interview with BikeRadar

Click here to check out the great interview on BikeRadar as Graeme Obree talks about his book The Obree Way.

Bike Radar

An Evening with Graeme Obree

As soon as we’d tweeted about the Bloomsbury Institute Evening with Graeme Obree to celebrate the publication of The Obree Way, tickets sold out quicker than for a One Direction concert.

Last night an audience of cyclists and Obree fans gathered to hear the great man interviewed by journalist Richard Moore. An hour didn’t seem enough – 60 minutes to cover such a varied career – the world records, the World Championships, the UCI, the movie of his life, the highs, the lows, the Beastie… With Richard at the tiller the audience were guided through Graeme’s career, and his own inimitable take on cycling, life and motivation.

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Publisher Charlotte Croft, cycling legend Graeme Obree and sports journalist Richard Moore

Graeme pulls no punches – his refusal to enter the doping programme for Le Groupement lost him his professional cycling career (and the shortest pro contract ever at 11 hours in total from signing it to being kicked off, he laughed…), but he winningly argued that come what may, he retains his self-respect and pride in his decision. Asked about the UCI he was winningly supportive – while their decision-making damaged his career he argued that it pushed him on to continue innovating, and also that without their volunteers and officials cycling events simply wouldn’t happen. Asked what his greatest wish for cycling was he used the opportunity to despair at the lack of support for women’s cycling – and especially a women’s Tour de France.

It was a fascinating opportunity to hear from a cycling legend – an iconoclast and innovator who has pushed the boundaries throughout his career.

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Graeme takes time out to chat with his fans

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Two great Scots


Post by Charlotte Croft, Head of Sport

3404 kilometres, 21 stages, 21 stories? It must be the new ‘Rouleur Centenary Tour de France’

PrintWith just under a month to go before we publish it, I thought I’d let our cycling fans have a sneaky peak at the new photographic book by Rouleur.

For the 100th running of the Tour de France, top cycling magazine Rouleur sent seven writers and photographers on the road at the Tour, each given three stages to record their individual takes on the race. Rouleur Centenary Tour de France captures these stories and provides a fascinating look at the race.

Out 7th November, it’ll make a nifty Christmas present for the lycra lovers among us.

« 3,404 kilometres »   « 21 stages »   « 21 stories »

Rouleur: Century Tour de France

Rouleur: Century Tour de France

 

Parc des Princes for the finish in Paris, 1951. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day

Stage 21


Finish in sight

The peloton swings into a packed Parc des Princes for the traditional finish of the Tour in 1951. Hugo Koblet, second from the left, made it two Tour victories in a row for Switzerland, following Ferdi Kübler’s win in 1950.

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These photos can be found on page 75 of Tour de France 100.

Poor Alps road surface during the 1920 Tour. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day


Stage 20

Alpine tracks
Léon Scieur in the Alps on his way to winning stage 11, between Grenoble and Gex, during the 1920 Tour. The picture acts as a stark illustration of the poor quality of the road surfaces at the time.

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These photos can be found on page 39 of Tour de France 100.

The Alps during the 1913 Tour. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day


Stage 19

Hairpin hell
Jean Alavoine and Firmin Lambot climb the Alpine monster, the Col du Galibier, during the 1913 Tour.

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These photos can be found on page 27 of Tour de France 100.

Fausto Coppi was also a great time triallist, seen here in 1949. #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day

Stage 17

Velvet smoothness
The rider known as Il Campionissimo (champion of champions), Fausto Coppi, in full flight during the 1949 Tour, the first of his two victories. Coppi was arguably the first ‘modern’ cyclist, and, as far as some are concerned, the ultimate stylist. He and his great rival, Gino Bartali, scored an Italian one-two in this Tour, with ‘Il Pio’ (the pious), second.

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These photos can be found on page 70 of Tour de France 100.

Jean-Francois Bernard won in Gap, today’s finish town, in 1986 #tdf

Bloomsbury Sport’s Tour de France Photo of the Day

Stage 16
Tan lines

Another piece of history was made by Shelley Verses, the American soigneur with the French Toshiba squad. Verses was believed to be the first woman to work for a team, first coming with the 7-Eleven squad in 1986. On the massage table, studying the results sheet, is Jean-François Bernard, who was tipped as Hinault’s successor but could not emulate the Badger.

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These photos can be found on page 159 of Tour de France 100.
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